“Start by saying thank you,” she says. “Then have a conversation about the new role and what would be expected of you in the position. Ask if it would make sense for you to stay in your current job for at least a while longer, for example. That way, you’re not just saying no. You’re discussing what the best option would be, with your manager’s input.”

In other words, make it a collaborative experience that shows your manager you respect their point of view. And remember: This promotion may not feel right today, but things could change later down the road. Leave the possibility open so that the offer may still be there when you’re ready.

When we talk about happiness at work, we usually focus on ways to boost your satisfaction and land a position that offers a sense of purpose and fulfillment.

With numbers like those, it stands to reason that most workers aren’t necessarily itching for a new position — but if you’re doing stellar work, a well-deserved promotion may be headed your way.

While recognition from higher-ups always feels good, moving up the food chain may not be something that interests you. And that’s okay.

Is That Promotion Right for You?

If your boss offers you a promotion, don’t accept it automatically. Instead, take some time to mull it over. Look out for these red flags that signal this step may not be in your best interest:

The New Role Won’t Advance Your Career

Take some time to think about where you’d like your job to take you over the long haul. Is this promotion a step in that direction? If it takes you on a detour or represents a lateral move, step back and look at the big picture. Some promotions can change your career trajectory, and that may not be a good thing.

The Position Will Take a Toll on Your Personal Life

We’re all striving to achieve work/life balance, or at least come close. When considering a promotion, get real about the new workload. Is it likely to eat into your life outside of work?

The Money Isn’t Worth It

Considering how much this promotion would increase your workload, does the corresponding pay make sense? Does it fit into your overall plan for growing your wealth?

That said, don’t be so quick to walk away if money is the only thing giving you pause. Everything’s open to negotiation. Come to the discussion ready to talk about concrete ways you plan on moving the needle on the company’s revenue goals, along with a number that would make the promotion worth your while.

How to Decline a Promotion Without Burning Bridges

So you’ve weighed the pros and cons, and you’ve ultimately decided this promotion isn’t for you. Now for the tough part: breaking the news to your boss.

“Start by saying thank you,” she says. “Then have a conversation about the new role and what would be expected of you in the position. Ask if it would make sense for you to stay in your current job for at least a while longer, for example. That way, you’re not just saying no. You’re discussing what the best option would be, with your manager’s input.”

In other words, make it a collaborative experience that shows your manager you respect their point of view. And remember: This promotion may not feel right today, but things could change later down the road. Leave the possibility open so that the offer may still be there when you’re ready.

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